Tuesday, October 18

8:00-12:00 noon

Tutorial Session 1 Phased Array Antenna Measurements Dr. Alan J. Fenn, Fellow IEEE, MIT Lincoln Laboratory; Dr. Charles Kryzak, Alion Science and Technology Microwave Array Beamforming:  Analog, Digital, and Photonic Dr. Hans Steyskal, Arcon; Dr. Jeffrey Herd and Dr. Paul Juodawlkis, MIT Lincoln Laboratory Phased Arrays for MIMO Radar Dr. Vito F. Mecca, Dr. Frank Robey, Dr. Daniel Rabideau,  MIT Lincoln Laboratory Advances in SiGe BiCMOS Technology with Chip Scale Phased Array Applications Dr. Gabriel Rebeiz, UCSD

9:30 - 5:50pm

Student Program Student Program Flyer

1:30 - 5:50pm

Plenary Session Co-Chair: David Mooradd, MIT Lincoln Laboratory; Co-Chair: Dr. Eli Brookner, Raytheon (retired) Eden Vale Ballroom B&C 1:30 Introduction Dr. Jeffrey S. Herd, General Conference Chair 1:42 Introduction to Technical Program Dr. Alan J. Fenn,Technical Program Chair 1:47 Introduction to Plenary Session Dr. Eli Brookner, Raytheon (retired) 1:50 From Vision to Reality 50+ Years of Phased Array Development William Delaney* (MIT Lincoln Laboratory) Development of phased array technology got an added incentive in the late 1950’s with the dawn of the space age and the prospect of long range ballistic missiles.  The mechanization of a phased array antenna in the early 1960’s was a substantial challenge in technology, cost and likely reliability.  This talk describes early efforts at the MIT Lincoln Laboratory and the nation in the early 1960’s.  The talk follows the development and deployment of a number of phased array systems that acted as “stepping stones” to today’s impressive capabilities in all solid state phased array radars.  This history of development is an encouraging example of the engineering “vision” process and the talk closes with a commentary on engineers and their visions. 2:20 The Evolution of Airborne Fighter Phased Array Radars Tony Fischetti* (Northrop Grumman Corporation) 2:50 Application of MIMO Radar Techniques to Over-the-Horizon Radar Gordon Frazer* (NSI Division, DST Group) Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) radar has been an active topic in the radar research community for over a decade. MIMO based approaches have been investigated for improving target detectability, improving target localisation, achieving higher spatial resolution, and clutter reduction using transmit or joint transmit-receive beamforming. This paper describes the experience of the author in applying MIMO radar techniques to challenges in Over-the-Horizon Radar (OTHR). 3:20 BREAK 3:50 History and Progress of Phased Array Developments at ELTA/IAI Israel Lupa* (Elta Systems Ltd) 4:20 Overview of the Large Digital Arrays of the Space Fence Radar Joseph Haimerl* (Lockheed Martin MST) Space Fence, currently under construction on Kwajalein Atoll, will revolutionize Space Situational Awareness (SSA) using advanced phased array radar technology in two of the largest phased arrays to ever be constructed. Space Fence will provide catalog completeness, accuracy and timeliness with vastly improved performance in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and capability to support missions in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). Attaining detection and tracking performance within the large coverage volume necessitated developing advanced technologies including long-pulse high-duty factor Gallium Nitride (GaN) transmit modules, low-cost dual-polarized Radio Frequency Integrated Circuit (RFIC) receivers, and element-level digital beamforming across 86,000 receive elements. These technologies have been matured to Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 7 and Manufacturing Readiness Level (MRL) 7 based on end-to-end scaled prototypes. This paper will summarize these technologies, the design choices that led to their selection, and their application to the Space Fence phased arrays. 4:50 Creating a Universal Radio Frequency Front-End for Elemental Digital Beam Formed Phased Arrays Roy Olsson* (DARPA) Kyle Bunch (Booz Allen Hamilton) Christal Gordon (Booz Allen Hamilton) Nancy Zhou (Booz Allen Hamilton) The DARPA Arrays at Commercial Timescales (ACT) program seeks to lower the nonrecurring engineering costs and timeframe of designing and upgrading phased arrays through the use of a common hardware module that can be reused across many phased array missions and array sizes.  The ACT program seeks to utilize elemental level digital beamforming to remove many of the fixed choices, e.g. array size, number of beams, center frequency and bandwidth, associated with analog beamformer implementations.  One of the main challenges in realizing this vision is the implementation of a common RF front- end that can be used to down/up covert RF signals over a wide range of center frequencies and bandwidths into the analog bandwidth of typical data converters.  This paper describes research from the DARPA ACT and RF-FPGA programs in pursuit of this universal RF front-end. 5:20 WELCOME RECEPTION AND COCKTAIL HOUR
2016 IEEE International Symposium on Phased Array Systems and Technology
18 - 21 October 2016 Waltham, MA USA
Tuesday, October 18

8:00-12:00 noon

Tutorial Session 1 Phased Array Antenna Measurements Dr. Alan J. Fenn, Fellow IEEE, MIT Lincoln Laboratory; Dr. Charles Kryzak, Alion Science and Technology Microwave Array Beamforming:  Analog, Digital, and Photonic Dr. Hans Steyskal, Arcon; Dr. Jeffrey Herd and Dr. Paul Juodawlkis, MIT Lincoln Laboratory Phased Arrays for MIMO Radar Dr. Vito F. Mecca, Dr. Frank Robey, Dr. Daniel Rabideau,  MIT Lincoln Laboratory Advances in SiGe BiCMOS Technology with Chip Scale Phased Array Applications Dr. Gabriel Rebeiz, UCSD

9:30 - 5:50pm

Student Program Student Program Flyer

1:30 - 5:50pm

Plenary Session Co-Chair: David Mooradd, MIT Lincoln Laboratory; Co-Chair: Dr. Eli Brookner, Raytheon (retired) Eden Vale Ballroom B&C 1:30 Introduction Dr. Jeffrey S. Herd, General Conference Chair 1:42 Introduction to Technical Program Dr. Alan J. Fenn,Technical Program Chair 1:47 Introduction to Plenary Session Dr. Eli Brookner, Raytheon (retired) 1:50 From Vision to Reality 50+ Years of Phased Array Development William Delaney* (MIT Lincoln Laboratory) Development of phased array technology got an added incentive in the late 1950’s with the dawn of the space age and the prospect of long range ballistic missiles.  The mechanization of a phased array antenna in the early 1960’s was a substantial challenge in technology, cost and likely reliability.  This talk describes early efforts at the MIT Lincoln Laboratory and the nation in the early 1960’s.  The talk follows the development and deployment of a number of phased array systems that acted as “stepping stones” to today’s impressive capabilities in all solid state phased array radars.  This history of development is an encouraging example of the engineering “vision” process and the talk closes with a commentary on engineers and their visions. 2:20 The Evolution of Airborne Fighter Phased Array Radars Tony Fischetti* (Northrop Grumman Corporation) 2:50 Application of MIMO Radar Techniques to Over-the- Horizon Radar Gordon Frazer* (NSI Division, DST Group) Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) radar has been an active topic in the radar research community for over a decade. MIMO based approaches have been investigated for improving target detectability, improving target localisation, achieving higher spatial resolution, and clutter reduction using transmit or joint transmit-receive beamforming. This paper describes the experience of the author in applying MIMO radar techniques to challenges in Over-the-Horizon Radar (OTHR). 3:20 BREAK 3:50 History and Progress of Phased Array Developments at ELTA/IAI Israel Lupa* (Elta Systems Ltd) 4:20 Overview of the Large Digital Arrays of the Space Fence Radar Joseph Haimerl* (Lockheed Martin MST) Space Fence, currently under construction on Kwajalein Atoll, will revolutionize Space Situational Awareness (SSA) using advanced phased array radar technology in two of the largest phased arrays to ever be constructed. Space Fence will provide catalog completeness, accuracy and timeliness with vastly improved performance in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and capability to support missions in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). Attaining detection and tracking performance within the large coverage volume necessitated developing advanced technologies including long-pulse high-duty factor Gallium Nitride (GaN) transmit modules, low-cost dual-polarized Radio Frequency Integrated Circuit (RFIC) receivers, and element-level digital beamforming across 86,000 receive elements. These technologies have been matured to Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 7 and Manufacturing Readiness Level (MRL) 7 based on end-to-end scaled prototypes. This paper will summarize these technologies, the design choices that led to their selection, and their application to the Space Fence phased arrays. 4:50 Creating a Universal Radio Frequency Front-End for Elemental Digital Beam Formed Phased Arrays Roy Olsson* (DARPA) Kyle Bunch (Booz Allen Hamilton) Christal Gordon (Booz Allen Hamilton) Nancy Zhou (Booz Allen Hamilton) The DARPA Arrays at Commercial Timescales (ACT) program seeks to lower the nonrecurring engineering costs and timeframe of designing and upgrading phased arrays through the use of a common hardware module that can be reused across many phased array missions and array sizes.  The ACT program seeks to utilize elemental level digital beamforming to remove many of the fixed choices, e.g. array size, number of beams, center frequency and bandwidth, associated with analog beamformer implementations.  One of the main challenges in realizing this vision is the implementation of a common RF front-end that can be used to down/up covert RF signals over a wide range of center frequencies and bandwidths into the analog bandwidth of typical data converters.  This paper describes research from the DARPA ACT and RF-FPGA programs in pursuit of this universal RF front-end. 5:20 WELCOME RECEPTION AND COCKTAIL HOUR
2016 IEEE International Symposium on Phased Array Systems and Technology
18 - 21 October 2016 Waltham, MA USA